A Lego Gumball Machine – Not For Human Consumption

Anthony Sejourne Lego Gumball
“I think this set can seduce a lot of people because it is an ancient and modern object at once, it can remember the childhood memories for some.

Je pense que cet ensemble peut séduire un grand nombre de personnes car c’est un objet ancien et moderne à la fois, il peut rappeler les souvenirs d’enfance pour certains.” — Anthony Séjourné

This cute little Lego gumball machine is a great retro styled MOC. It even features a spinning dial/handle. It does not take coins though, and the gum balls are not edible. This project is the work of Anthony Séjourné, who has a Lego Ideas page: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/166207
Anthony Sejourne Lego Gumball Machine

These Lego Classic Sega Arcade Machines Are Radical!

SpacySmoke Lego Classic Sega Arcade

Some of the most impressive Arcade Machines in the 1980s and 1990s were from Sega. They were the masters of the oversized deluxe cabinets. SpacySmoke has recreated some of the iconic cabinets in their Lego Sega Classic Arcade Machines series. These are built in scale for Minifigures. They would fit right in with the Lego Dimensions Midway Retro Gamer. A whole Lego arcade could be put built, where your Minifigs can spend Saturday nights.

There are four Sega Arcade machines. They are all based on the deluxe versions. One awesome detail is that these Lego MOCs replicate the movements of the real life cabinets. Out Run (one of the most famous racing games) features a Lego model that moves left and right. Just like the real game. Space Harrier (a weird shooter game) can move up, down, left, right and tilt. Thunder Blade (a helicopter game) can rotate. While Hang-On (a motorcycle game) tilts left and right.

SpacySmoke Lego Sega Classic Arcade Out RunSpacySmoke Lego Sega Classic Arcade Space HarrierSpacySmoke Lego Sega Classic Arcade Out Run Thunder BladeSpacySmoke Lego Sega Classic Arcade Out Run Hang On

Sega Arcade Machines Lego Ideas:

The Lego Sega Classic Arcade Machines, created by SpacySmoke, are up on Lego Ideas. So if you want to read more about them, and vote in support of the project check out this link: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/96810

The Pegasus Automaton. A Lego Kinetic Sculpture.

Amida's Lego Pegasus Automaton 02

An Automaton is a movable mechanical kinetic device, usually imitating humans. These machines were extremely popular from 1860–1910. Some of them had very basic movements, such as arms/limbs, but others were much more complicated. The best Automatons could write, speak, serve tea, and sing. Amida, of BrickLink, created their own Lego Pegasus Automaton. A kinetic sculpture created entirely out of Lego. By turning a single gear, this graceful beast can flap its wings, move its tail, and pivot its body. All these movements come together in a pretty lifelike animation of flying. The white, brown, gray, and gold color palette, and some of the small details (the crystal knob) create a piece that could fit into any Jules Verne, or Steam Punk collection. Make sure to check out the video below.

“This Pegasus Automaton is moved by a series of mechanical gears and cranks. The Pegasus of white, hovering and flapping her wings, is recreated in balanced and correct body proportions to give vivid feelings. The gearbox has an antique beauty in clockwork style.” — Amida

Amida's Lego Pegasus Automaton 01

Pegasus Automaton from Amida Na on Vimeo.

The Pegasus Automaton Lego MOC can be found over on BrickLink: http://moc.bricklink.com/pages/moc/mocitem.page?idmocitem=1284

Lego Arcade Machines. 1980s Style.

BreaksBricks's Lego Arcade Machines 1980

Do you have fond memories of Space Invaders, Donkey Kong, Pac-Man, Zaxxon, and Street Fighter 2? BreaksBricks does, and has created an amazingly rad Lego Arcade over on Lego Ideas. Their Lego “Arcade Machines 1980!” contains all the pieces to create your own Arcade. These would also fit in at any Pizzeria or Movie Theater. These Coin-Ops even include a money changer and gumball machine. These machines have been created for maximum nostalgia but an interesting proposal makes them sticker friendly. Meaning you could create your own stickers to transform these cabinets into your favorite games. Surprisingly Lego and the classic Arcade Machines go together pretty well. There are many different creations out there.

BreaksBricks's Lego Arcade Machines 1980 Detail

Lego Arcade Machines 1980 includes:

  • Stand up arcade machine with joystick control
  • Stand up arcade machine with driving wheel control
  • Cocktail arcade machine with stools for seated playing
  • Classic change machine with dollar slot and coin tray
  • Classic gumball machine filled with 1×1 round plate gumballs!

“These machines would really stand out on display shelves and attract a lot of attention from Lego enthusiasts of all ages. Many Lego builders like myself grew up obsessed with video games and would naturally gravitate towards kits that feature nostalgic arcade machines from their childhood.”

BreaksBricks's Lego Arcade Machines 1980 Pac-Man

Go vote for Lego “Arcade Machines 1980!” over on Lego Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/88635

Lego Arcade Machines and Player 1

JoshuaDrake's Lego Arcade Machine Player 1

Ready your plastic Lego coins. A new arcade is about to open. Joshua Drake has created a whole series of Lego Arcade Machines. These video game machines have been sized to fit the Lego Technic Figures. These figures were featured in some of the Technic sets between 1986 and 2001. Their taller stature is a perfect match. If you look closely enough you can see that the hands line up perfectly with the arcade joystick and buttons. These are not the clean cabinets made today, these arcade machines are dirty, with some scuff marks and scrapes applied to the Lego pieces. Even the studs-on-top design help the cabinets achieve their 1980s retro look.

JoshuaDrake's Lego Arcade Machines Blue JoshuaDrake's Lego Arcade Machines Yellow JoshuaDrake's Lego Arcade Cabinet Mystery Yellow JoshuaDrake's Lego Arcade Cabinet Mystery Blue

Check out Joshua Drake’s Lego Arcade Machines over on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/106083641@N02/15551395198/

The Amazing Lego Great Ball Contraption (GBC) Layout 2012.9

http://youtu.be/sUtS52lqL5w

The Lego Great Ball Contraption (GBC) Layout 2012.9 is an incredibly famous MOC. The whole thing is built using a modular system. A total of 17 modules combine to create this massive contraption. It runs 500 Lego balls, at a rate of 1 ball per second, through a 31 meter course. Featuring zigzag stairs, pneumatics, shooters, trains, screw and spiral lifts, elevators and conveyor belts. Lego bricks, technic and Mindstorm, all come together in a very unique machine. One thing is certain this Lego machine is loud.

The Lego Great Ball Contraption (GBC) 2012.9 is a creation of YouTube user Akiyuky, more contraptions can be found on his blog: http://legokarakuri.blog91.fc2.com